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Classic speedsters up for auction


  • By Neil Martin
  • News
H&H Classics

 

The H&H Classics sale at Buxton next week will see a 1963 E-Type Jaguar Roadster (valued at around £50,000 to £60,000) and a 1935 AC 16/66 Drophead Coupe (£30,000 to £35,000) go under the hammer.

The 1935 E-Type was built to sprint from 0-60mph in 6.9 seconds and onto 150mph. This car has been sensibly upgraded said H&H and used extensively for UK, and continental touring. It was originally supplied by Ritchies of Glasgow.

H&H told GBI Magazine that: “Launched at the 1961 Geneva Motor Show the Jaguar E-Type was nothing short of a revelation. With its heady blend of supercar performance, breath-taking styling and low price tag, the newcomer left rivals reeling and customers clamouring. Earlysport scar racing success at the hands of Graham Hill and Roy Salvadori amongst others helped cement its reputation.

“Built as a monocoque with a front sub-frame to cradle the engine, the model’s combination of all-round independent suspension (torsion-bar front / coil-sprung rear) rack and pinion steering and four-wheel disc brakes gave it excellent road holding and handling capabilities. Its indomitable 3781cc straight-six engine was quoted as developing some 265bhp and 260lbft of torque. Allied to a four-speed Moss gearbox with synchromesh on 2nd, 3rd and 4th.”

 

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The 1935 AC Drophead Coupe has been in its current ownership since 2001 and features full weather equipment, a hydraulic brake conversion, alternator and spin on oil filter conversion and a Kenlowe electric fan.

H&H said: “AC, one of the longest surviving manufacturers of quality vehicles in Britain, produced some wonderful cars over the years. They started in business as tricycle manufacturers some ninety years ago and although they have had various problems along the way, they are still here – which is more than can be said for a lot of the others. It is worth noting that in the 1920’s there were some 380 car manufacturers in Britain – in 1995 only ten remained; four were still in British ownership, and just two were independent. AC was one of those.”

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